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The little business school that could

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The University of Calgary Haskayne School of Business ranks among the world's best according to a new report.

In the recently published Beyond Grey Pinstripes 2005 report, Haskayne was ranked number 25 of nearly 100 participating schools. The report, a project of the World Resources Institute and the Aspen Institute, evaluates schools from around the world on the integration of social and environmental responsibility into the MBA program, and shows Haskayne to be strong in these areas.

The report stresses that companies want graduates who can manage these new responsibilities, rather than just another person in a snappy suit with degree in hand.

"What differentiates Haskayne from other business schools is that we are a leader in integrating social and environmental sustainability into all our programs," said Haskayne professor and Suncor Energy Chair in Competitive Strategy and Sustainable Development, Dr. Harrie Vredenburg, noting that in the business world, being different can mean getting hired, and with Haskayne's approach to sustainability, it can make a world of difference.

The report is a biennial survey of MBA programs from around the world. The survey collected information from close to 100 participating business schools with respect to course work, faculty research, institutional support at the school and a 500-word summary of their program. The institute then processed the data and evaluated the schools based on student opportunity, student exposure, course content, and faculty research.

The Haskayne School of Business, although showing proficiency in all areas of the evaluation, particularly excelled in faculty research. Vredenburg said being a relatively new field of interest, the U of C has researched and published a large portion of its knowledge base, acting as pioneers in the area of social and environmental sustainability. Accordingly the U of C has surpassed many schools in research and publishing, including the number one school, Stanford.

Vredenburg said he was pleased with the results of the survey, which show Haskayne is doing a good job. The results validate the importance of sustainability in business, a rapidly growing area of concern for corporations. Graduates from Haskayne are better at adapting to the changing business environment, making them in tune to the needs of companies, he said.

"Business is more than just grey pinstripes," said Vredenburg.

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Comments

The only rankings that matter for business schools are the Business Week and Financial Times rankings.

In fact, Haskayne's mission is to be Top-50 in the FT rankings, yet, we don't appear in the published list.

So, the question then is how do we try and make the move up the rankings? It starts with leadership - make Dean Grandin commit to more than the 15 hours a week he currently puts in (yes, make him go part-time at Fording coal)... We need active, not passive leadership to improve my alma mater