2001-10-25

    
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  2001-10-25

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October 25, 2001
  Break a sweat to save your breastsPDF files may take a moment to load

There is new hope for women interested in reducing their risk of breast cancer.

Dr. Christine Freidenreich and her team of researchers from the Alberta Cancer Board and the University of Calgary recently released the third part of a study that indicates regular physical activity can reduce a woman's risk of breast cancer by 40 per cent.

"Until now there have been very few modifiable behaviours that have been proven to have an effect," said Friedenreich. "Diet hasn't been shown to have an effect."

October 25, 2001
  Reaching out for fifteen yearsPDF files may take a moment to load

There was no cake and no candles, but a healthy number of guests fêted the University of Calgary International Centre in a healthy fashion last Thu., Oct. 18.

Over the past 15 years, the centre has quietly gained the respect of the world's academic and global development communities, garnering praise and appreciation from many.

October 25, 2001
  U of C spearheads cyber-CanadianaPDF files may take a moment to load

Those searching for Canada's presence on the web may soon have to look no further than a single database.

The University of Calgary's Canadian Heritage project is an endeavour to document and organize Canadian content on the Internet. By its completion in 10 months, 35,000 Canadian Web sites will have been evaluated and assembled into one central location known as Canada Place.

October 25, 2001
  The day the music diedPDF files may take a moment to load

The music of the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra hasn't died, though it has been silent for two weeks. The classical triumphs that usually echo through the Jack Singer Concert Hall are gone. Things are quieter since the CPO Board of Directors locked out the musicians on midnight Sat., Oct. 7, over contract disputes.

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October 25, 2001
  Losing controlPDF files may take a moment to load

Alan Cumyn hits the mark with his newest novel, losing it. The Ottawa-based Giller Prize finalist, with his first effort as a full-time author, snaps a dark but humorous picture of the dysfunctionality of family life.

October 25, 2001
  Passion and adventure on one wheelPDF files may take a moment to load

Say you're on the summit of a peak in Mexico, and you've got three ways of getting down. Your radio looks like a tasty option--calling for a comfy helicopter ride off the roof of Mexico's tallest volcano el Pico de Orizaba means you'd be home in time for tacos. You also have some ropes for a quick rappel off the peak, but you've gone down that way a thousand billion times. Then you've got this unicycle...

October 25, 2001
  Remembering momPDF files may take a moment to load

For the Pleasure of Seeing Her Again opens by telling you what you're not about to see.

"No ghosts will come to haunt the battlements of a castle in the Kingdom of Denmark where, apparently, something is rotten," the narrator begins. "You won't see a brute of a man rip his sweat-drenched T-shirt, shouting: 'Stella! Stella!'"

He was right. We didn't see any of this. The script wasn't complicated, nor were its characters. And the story, well, there wasn't much of a story.

October 25, 2001
  Classic Wilde in modern timesPDF files may take a moment to load

Can you imagine audiences watching Dude, Where's my Car or American Pie a century from now? Somehow, such comedies lack the timelessness of a classic--that, and they're funny to select audiences.

October 25, 2001
  Getting lost on Mulholland DrivePDF files may take a moment to load

This movie is fucked up.

Not that it's necessarily a bad thing, but I find it hard to critique a movie that I don't truly understand. I figure that after reading a couple papers on the movie and seeing it about 14 more times, I should be up to speed with everything.

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