2001-07-26

    
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  2001-07-26

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July 26, 2001
  Don't nuke that cold sorePDF files may take a moment to load

Researchers in the University of Calgary Health Sciences Department are determined to develop a biological, cancer-killing machine by fair means or foul.

Last month, the medical community watched excitedly as a U of C research team revealed test results of the seemingly harmless Respiratory Enteric Orphan virus as an oncolytic (cancer-attacking) treatment. Dr. Patrick Lee, a member of the team, has now revealed another striking discovery: the use of the Herpes Simplex Virus as another potential oncolytic treatment.

July 26, 2001
  New administrator, same debt loadPDF files may take a moment to load

Post-secondary students across Alberta have a new name to remember this summer.

Effective July 31, 2001, the province's agreement with the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce expires and the provincial government takes over responsibility for financing all Alberta Student Loans. The province has contracted EDULINX Canada Corporation to administer the loans.

July 26, 2001
  Suck it up EdmontonPDF files may take a moment to load

The inevitability of the situation was overwhelming. Nearly a decade has passed since its intensity burned hottest. Some had even written it off as a piece of history, a moment in time that will never be forgotten, but never repeated. Yet, over the past few months, the sleeping monster has begun to stir, and all members involved are realizing that it wasn't dead, just dormant.

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July 26, 2001
  The 24 hour test of body and mindPDF files may take a moment to load

This past weekend, thousands of mountain bike racers converged on the Canmore Nordic Center to compete in a annual bike race. The race required guts, stamina and "24 Hours of Adrenalin."

July 26, 2001
  Big Billy's trip to WinnipegPDF files may take a moment to load

Bill Byma is in Winnipeg and he's not too happy about it.

"Winnipeg blows ass," said the former University of Calgary volleyball star. "It's so hot here and the mosquitoes are killing me."

Byma is in Winnipeg with the Canadian National Team but while his game is better than ever, his health is not. Byma missed a month-and-a-half of training due to a bout with mono which probably explains his surly demeanour.

July 26, 2001
  G-8 in K-Country: Recipe for disasterPDF files may take a moment to load

Like a high school party that descends into chaos, any international summit staged in Kananaskis will only result in disaster. The facts of the matter are simple, but above all, the area cannot support the Group of Eight summit as it will surely happen in 2002.

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July 26, 2001
  Flannel Jimmy's keepin' it simplePDF files may take a moment to load

The old cliché of getting yourself discovered by dating a big record label exec isn't far off from Flannel Jimmy's humble beginnings back in 1998.

"Most of us went to [the University of British Columbia] and we met a girl there who was going out with an A & R guy from Nettwerk," says Flannel Jimmy frontman Andrew Babuin about signing with Nettwerk Records, which ultimately led to the release of their first self-titled album in May.

July 26, 2001
  Up-beat cynicism worth the waitPDF files may take a moment to load

Never has a press release been so right.

The Nettwerk biography of The Proclaimers calls brothers Charlie and Craig Reid "uncompromising musicians," and the name is well deserved.

July 26, 2001
  Festival fills folk music voidPDF files may take a moment to load

The more things change, the more they stay the same.

That seems to be the theme surrounding the 2001 Calgary Folk Music Festival. According to festival Associate Producer Kerry Clarke, while the artists may switch from year to year, the format is much the same--from the qualities of performers to the type of crowds to the workshops, a festival favourite.

July 26, 2001
  Victoria Williams' show-and-tellPDF files may take a moment to load

While on the road, folk artist Victoria Williams can be seen anywhere from thrift stores, the local zoo or swimming in the Bow River.

"Last time I was at the [Calgary] Folk Festival, I went swimming in it," recalls Williams, who isn't discounting the possibility of returning to Calgary's main waterway between performances and workshops at this year's festival. "It just depends what crosses my path."

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