2001-02-15

    
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  2001-02-15

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February 15, 2001
  Readers defend and define ChristianityPDF files may take a moment to load

Editors, the Gauntlet,

Re: "Homophobic dogma enraptures Christians," Feb. 8, 2001

Brad Cooke's article suggested that religion should have no place in decisions regarding civil liberty. However, without religion what is the difference between acceptable and unacceptable behaviour?

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February 15, 2001
  Readers defend and define ChristianityPDF files may take a moment to load

Editors, the Gauntlet,

Re: "Homophobic dogma enraptures Christians," Feb. 8, 2001

While Brad Cooke brings up legitimate concerns, he may be comforted to know that not all Christians think alike. Just as Fundamentalist rhetoric concerning marginalized groups hasn't changed in 100 years, neither has genuine Christians' support for those same groups.

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February 15, 2001
  Bizarro Sports: Tales from KazakhstanPDF files may take a moment to load

The Dinos men's volleyball team was in for a surprise Monday afternoon at practice when immigration officials came knockin' at the door.

"It was bound to happen sometime," said Head Coach Greg Ryan, looking obviously stressed. "I knew that day would come, but come on; we're right in the middle of playoffs!"

February 15, 2001
  "A degree is a public good, not a commodity"PDF files may take a moment to load

When DeVry Institute of Technology was granted the right to grant university baccalaureates in three degree programs, it became the first institution in Alberta not recognized as a university to hold this privilege.

In the weeks passed since then, members of the academic community have stressed a fine philosophical difference between a university and a vocational institute--in particular a for-profit institute--which they feel must be recognized.

February 15, 2001
  Jean the barbarianPDF files may take a moment to load

On Feb. 12, Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chrétien stood before an undoubtedly nervous group of aspiring Chinese judges. The figure before them was the head of state of one of the most peaceful and just nations in the world, and these judges were no doubt expecting a lecture condemning their own government for being the opposite: barbaric, undemocratic and among the worst human-rights abusers in the world.

However, instead of a tongue-lashing, the Chinese audience heard the following:

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