2005-07-28

    
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  2005-07-28

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July 28, 2005
  Folk Fest: Winnipeg inspirationPDF files may take a moment to load

The Wailin' Jennys are the quintessential folk-group--their vocal talents blend in beautiful three-part harmonies without overshadowing one another. Accompanied by acoustic guitar, violin, mandolin and banjo, the Wailin' Jennys comprises soprano Ruth Moody, mezzo Nicky Mehta and alto Annabelle Chvostek, perfectly showcasing classically trained voices in a blend of country-folk at home on any Calgary Folk Festival stage.

July 28, 2005
  A race day with the Soleon TeamPDF files may take a moment to load

For four long weeks, the University of Calgary's Solar Car Team slugged it out, busily making history in the 2005 North American Solar Challenge by simply qualifying as a rookie team, not to mention finishing ahead of some teams that had more than twice the time to build their cars.

July 28, 2005
  Theatre Preview: Bringing the bard outdoorsPDF files may take a moment to load

Many years ago, along the misty river banks of England, the words of Shakespeare would resonate across the water. Once again it is possible to hear those classic lines in iambic pentameter from a distance, yet this time the distance is from our own Prince's Island Park. Though flooding earlier this summer caused the annual Shakespeare in the Park production to move to the Mount Royal College amphitheatre. Water levels have since subsided, allowing the festival to return to the natural surroundings tucked away in our urban centre.

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July 28, 2005
  Art Preview: A poster named SuePDF files may take a moment to load

The invention of the poster dates back to the 15th century, where it introduced a new method of providing news, government proclamations and other information to the public. As time progressed, they were used to advertise events, like productions of Shakespeare plays. Soon they became an essential tool of advertisers, protestors and propagandists. In the late 19th century, Paris became the hot spot for colour poster culture, with a strong focus on design.

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July 28, 2005
  Folk Fest: Weakerthans talk powerPDF files may take a moment to load

A band with strong roots in punk rock, odd literary references and revolutionary politics isn't your typical performer at an Albertan folk festival. In fact, Winnipeg's Weakerthans might fit in better on the annual Vans Warped Tour than the Calgary Folk Festival in Prince's Island Park. Yet, the band was one of very few to make a return visit to this year's festival.

July 28, 2005
  Folk Fest: Chad VanGaalen breaks outPDF files may take a moment to load

Sometimes good things happen to good people. Sometimes the old adage claiming quality music will eventually be heard and appreciated, regardless of how obscure it is, turns out to be true. Sometimes nice guys don't finish last. Of course, none of these are usually the case. More often than not, things do not work out for those good people, their music isn't heard and they struggle across the finish line to be rewarded with yet another consolation ribbon for their sparse trophy case.

July 28, 2005
  Stimulating the brainPDF files may take a moment to load

Researchers at the University of Calgary are unlocking new insights into brain function, one cell at a time.

Dr. Jaideep Bains, assistant professor of physiology and biophysics at the Faculty of Medicine, led a research study on the role of glial cells in brain function. The study, appearing in the July issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience, suggests glia have a greater impact on communication within the brain than previously thought.

July 28, 2005
  Taking aim at indifferencePDF files may take a moment to load

The Bow River courses from the Wapta Icefield in the Rocky Mountains, through the heart of downtown Calgary and on into the semi-arid agricultural districts of southeastern Alberta. Supplying billions of cubic metres of fresh water annually for municipal and industrial users, as well as water treatment and mass irrigation systems, the Bow is the most altered and dammed river in Alberta. Yet the 1.12 million people living within the river's watershed hardly give it a second thought.

July 28, 2005
  London's war on backpacksPDF files may take a moment to load

Waking up to the jarring blare of your alarm clock, you look over and realize you're late. No time for coffee, barely enough time to throw on yesterday's clothes and run out the door. You catch the 8:05 am bus within seconds and start to think you may make it to work on time, just a short train ride left to go. You exit the bus and start towards the tube. Suddenly there's shouting on your left, you look over in time to see two men pulling guns on you.

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