2006-10-12

    
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  2006-10-12

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October 12, 2006
  The world of sports snippetsPDF files may take a moment to load

Cross country team does good

The Dinos cross country team has set a gold standard, taking the double gold in Saskatchewan Sat., Oct. 11.

"Well, it's always nice to win, eh?" said cross country coach Doug Lamont. "It's early in the season and we've still got a lot of work to do. Obviously it buoys their confidence with a win over most of the Canada West schools."

Geoff Kerr led the way for the men and Lindsay Winter for the women.

October 12, 2006
  Football: Dinos drop to 0-5PDF files may take a moment to load

Leading the Dinos' offence was freshman Dalin Tollestrup who completed 11 of 23 passes for 123 yards in the air. On the ground for the Dinos was a split backfield between Alex Andrews and Anthony Woodson. Andrews had 14 carries for 102 yards, while Woodson had 14 carries for 74 yards. K.C. Prince led the receivers with 39 yards in the air.

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October 12, 2006
  Men's Hockey: Dismal defence divides Dinos' dividendsPDF files may take a moment to load

The University of Calgary men's Dinos played two very different games with two very different results their opening weekend against the University of Manitoba Bison, Oct. 6-7. They split the series with a 7-5 Dinos victory on Friday night, followed by a hard-fought 2-1 defeat the following night.

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October 12, 2006
  Space ships will eat your childrenPDF files may take a moment to load

Real-time strategy in future space is a tired concept. Remember Starcraft? Total Annihilation? Or more recently, Star Wars: Empire At War? The long list of genre standards goes on, and consequently it's important for developers hoping to carve a niche for themselves in the RTS market to avoid falling into cliches.

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October 12, 2006
  Online Exclusive: Ceremony ushers in citizens, conference and changePDF files may take a moment to load

The University of Calgary Dining Centre played host to a gathering more remarkable than its usual 11 a.m. student traffic on Tues., Oct. 11: fifty freshly sworn in Canadian citizens.

In a ceremony kicking off a national immigration conference hosted by the University of Calgary's Faculty of Education, citizenship judge Hon. Patricia Gleason welcomed the new citizens to the first day of what she referred to as their new lives as members of the Canadian family.

October 12, 2006
  Helicopters in virtual realityPDF files may take a moment to load

A joint project between STARS air ambulance and the University of Calgary is using virtual reality to design the interior of two new helicopters.

STARS is getting two new Agusta Westland 139 helicopters, and though they will not take possession of the helicopters for at least a year, a U of C environmental design professor is teaming up with STARS nurses, paramedics and a design engineer to ensure every interior element is perfectly designed when the helicopters take to the sky.

October 12, 2006
  Bosch gets the bootPDF files may take a moment to load

Members of the University of Calgary Students' Union voted unanimously to fire operations and finance commissioner Mike Bosch from his post for failing to attend three consecutive Students' Legislative Council meetings.

The vote came in the Tues., Oct. 10 SLC meeting, as a result of Bosch neglecting his commissioner duties. Bosch was elected in the SU general election last March.

October 12, 2006
  In the lab before grad schoolPDF files may take a moment to load

Undergraduate students often have to wait until graduate school before they get to take part in research projects, that is, if they go to grad school at all.

It shouldn't be this way, according to University of Calgary administration, faculty and the Students' Union, who are working together to increase the opportunities for undergrad students to engage in research, years before they even apply to grad school.

October 12, 2006
  Editorial: Selling integrityPDF files may take a moment to load

In medieval England, advertising primarily consisted of a town crier shouting political proclamations in the public square. In today's world, a dapper gentleman in a tricorne hat shouting, "Hear ye! Hear ye! Just do it!" would be written off as either part of an innovative--and puzzling--new marketing campaign, or as a schizophrenic. Over the last 400 years, media has changed immensely. The Internet has made individuals privy to a wealth of information at any given moment--and print media is scrambling to stay relevant.

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