2008-10-02

    
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  2008-10-02

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October 02, 2008
  Student finds smallest dino in North AmericaPDF files may take a moment to load

Nick Longrich, a University of Calgary research associate, holds claim to finding not only the smallest dinosaur to date in North America, but also a rare insectivore.

The Albertonykus borealis-- "Albertonykus" means "Alberta Claw"-- was discovered a few years ago, but only recently made public. The fossils were dug up in an Albertosaurus bone bed sometime between 2000 and 2003. They were labelled and stored away among other fossils from the dig until Longrich, years later, found himself sifting through them.

October 02, 2008
  Speaker gives university education to those in needPDF files may take a moment to load

The developer of a new approach to help those in need will be sharing his ideas with students this week.

Renowned writer and social critic Earl Shorris will deliver a free public speech on the importance of making Humanities courses accessible to marginalized members of society Friday.

October 02, 2008
  Bees with disease bring farmers to their kneesPDF files may take a moment to load

With winter just around the corner, Alberta bee farmers can expect a sharp decline in their honeybee populations this year.

Alberta has over 250,000 bee colonies, surpassing the number of bees in any other province. It is estimated that Alberta's honeybee population is declining by 30 per cent while the U.S. is experiencing a large decline of over 36 per cent.

October 02, 2008
  Speaker denounces nuclear dangersPDF files may take a moment to load

Around the oil-rich streets of Calgary, talk of energy resources is no strange thing. But a unique twist will be brought to the discussion as Australian Dr. Helen Caldicott comes to speak about the dangers of nuclear technology.

October 02, 2008
  Spun: The FaminesPDF files may take a moment to load

Edmonton isn't just an ugly town full of stuck-up hipsters that like dance music too much. Sometimes they make good music too. This is where the Famines come in. Made up of artist and ex-Vertical Struts member Raymond Biesinger and Garrett Kruger, formerly of Wolfnote, the Famines throw down a sonic assault usually only found on a Shellac LP. This double seven-inch makes up for the fact it's only four songs long by packing more ear sex into 12 minutes than your favorite indie rock band can with cuteness.

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October 02, 2008
  Spun: Jarvis ChurchPDF files may take a moment to load

Jamaica exports many things we in Canada enjoy- bananas, for example- but the R&B singer originally from Jamaica, does not qualify. Consider investing your $10 in another of Jamaica's products rather than The Long Way Home. However, if you happen to be a grade seven girl, you will enjoy this album- it's sure to "Rock Your Body" in traditional club-fashion, boasting the same meaningless dance songs most of us have heard a million times already.

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October 02, 2008
  Spun: UnderoathPDF files may take a moment to load

Underoath fans won't be disappointed with the band's latest addition to their discography, Lost in the Sound of Separation, which offers no shortage of lyrical curiosity and pounding, harmonized instrumental components to match. Despite obvious growth in the band, their newest album feels as though it is a continuation of their 2006 release, Define the Great Line. The all-around hardness of the record continues the direction in which Underoath began to head, but is fittingly accompanied by softer melodies.

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October 02, 2008
  Spun: Gym Class HeroesPDF files may take a moment to load

The Gym Class Heroes don't exactly look like the type that would be dropping a record full of potentials for top hip-hop hits. Maybe pop, but not hip-hop. Their latest record The Quilt, however, is a fantastic mix of the boys and some of the greatest up-and-coming and already established artists.

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October 02, 2008
  Movie adaptation takes Palahniuk's words too literallyPDF files may take a moment to load

When best-selling novels are adapted for the big screen, criticisms are sometimes leveled against screenplay writers for diverging too far from the original story. Something always gets lost in the abridgement, rearrangement or direction the film takes contrary to what the author originally intended. Ultimately, the book is usually much better than the film. With this in mind, screenwriter and director Clark Gregg followed the Chuck Palahniuk novel almost to the letter in his latest film, Choke.

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