National award for DRC

The Disability Resource Centre got their cake and ate it too.

On Wed., Feb. 6, the University of Calgary DRC received a Certificate of Merit from the Canadian National Institute of the Blind and the Canadian Council of the Blind. The award recognized the DRC’s commitment to students who are blind, visually impaired, and deafblind. Alderman Diane Colley-Urqhart and officials from both organizations attended the celebrations.

"We’re very honoured to have our achievements recognized," said Dr. Peggy Patterson, Associate Vice-President Student Affairs. "The U of C has always tried to increase its accessibility and provide leadership for all students."

The award was presented in conjunction with White Cane Week. The week has created to increase public awareness about the abilities, concerns and needs of people with visual impairments.

"It’s good to see progress and the difference we’re making. We’re very much a part of the future," said Colley-Urqhart. "The white cane is a symbol of the blind, but also of courage and the independence of spirit."

"I would like to acknowledge the team of professionals at the DRC, who have done exemplary work here," added DRC Director Dr. Patricia Pardo. "As a former student with
a disability, I know personally the difference that the Disability Resource Centre can make for a student. I’m glad to contribute to
the calibre of this institution in my own
small way."

The DRC advises and assists the 400 students with disabilities at the U of C. They provide the students with information and specific services, such as a distraction-free environment and special facilities to enhance their university experience.

The DRC was created to advise and assist students with disabilities at the U of C. They provide the students with information and specific services, such as a distraction-free environment and special facilities to enhance their experience at the university. About 400 students with disabilities affect the U of C.

"Since being developed two years ago, the Nat Christie Adaptive Technology Centre has more than tripled in size," said Merlin Keillor, Adaptive Technology Specialist, about the centre being specifically designed for those with a visual impairment. "It really gives the U of C exposure in the eyes of prospective students. Hopefully in the future we will maintain our forward focus with technological access."

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