News
Enjoy it while it lasts. 3,600 new students will be invading campus for U of C 101.
the Gauntlet

U of C 101 rocks on

Publication YearIssue Date 

Showing more than 3,600 new University of Calgary students the ins and outs of campus social and academic life, U of C 101 is getting a little more personal and a lot louder this year.

One of the most visible changes to the week long frosh session are new Interfaculty Games, pitting faculties against each other in the ultimate test of physical and mental strength through tug-of-war, karaoke, dodge ball and trivia contests. The games will increase school spirit and end the orientation with a focus on the social aspect of university life, according to Students' Union Vice-President Events Alex Vyskocil.

"They try to end Friday with those wierd social events," said Vyskocil of previous U of C 101 wrap-ups."The Interfaculty Games will be an annual event with points and a trophy for the winning team. You take a lot away from orientation week if you focus only on school."

Other changes to this year's U of C 101 include more elective sessions for students to learn about aspects of university life which interest them.

"We're going to offer students more choice of workshops and carve out more time so they'll have more opportunity to take electives," said U of C 101 Coordinator Amy McEvoy. "There are more than 40 of these elective workshops which gives students more opportunity to personalize their session and tailor it to their unique needs."

That SUUShow will become a mandatory workshop this year. The SU saw a decrease in attendance at their elective sessions last year after the U of C 101 registration process went on-line.Vyskocil said he hopes this mandatory session will let frosh learn about the services offered by the SU.

In addition to the changes in student sessions, the Community Welcome--where all new students gather in the Jack Simpson gym for a formal welcome from U of C President Dr. Harvey Weingarten--will get a lot louder, but not until Weingarten leaves.

"The students, they appreciate that kind of quiet moment to realize their achievement--the invocation will be that piece," said McEvoy. "Then we go into the pep rally format."

"It going to be like a hockey game," said Vyskocil with a laugh.

Section: 

Issue: