Academic Probation

White male authorities to determine what we can do

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The U.S. Supreme Court has been deliberating a
Californian case regarding gay marriage. The court must determine whether or not to allow gay marriage in California.


“It’s about time someone made a decision on this,” said traditional marriage supporter Norman Greigson. “I’m tired about hearing deliberation on this. Finally someone can tell me if what I believe is right or not.”


“I have no real identification with the gay marriage movement,” Greigson continued. “I know I’m on the right side of history. Well, until these judges tell me I’m not.”


The proceedings began this past Tuesday. Hundreds have gathered outside the courts to voice whether or not they support marriage equality.


“Once this motion goes through, I’ll know for sure if I can go back to my regular life,” said pro-gay marriage protester Scott Peterson. 


Peterson and his protest group traveled from North Carolina to support the pro-gay marriage rally.


“We were all waiting in line at the local Starbucks and we got to talking,” Peterson said. “After waiting for us all to get our coffees, we just jumped on the next bus to D.C.” 


“We didn’t really have a purpose in mind, we just knew we needed to show moral support,” he continued. “Once the decision is made, it’ll be nice to go home and shower.”


Greigson, a Washington, D.C. local, did not have to travel far to show his support for traditional marriage. “My lack of distance traveled does not lessen how I feel about this issue! I’m very adamant to be here when the decision is made. After that I’ll know if I’ll need to change sides.”


Political scientist Eric Bauer noted how important a decision made by these non-Californian judges will be. “These judges have final say on what happens in this other state. It doesn’t really matter either that most of these men are in a traditional marriage, or have only mainstream perspectives,” Bauer continued. “These men are the authority on this matter, believe me.”


“Wouldn’t you want an unbiased, totally separate entity with no access to the experience of LGBTQ individuals to determine the rights of this huge group of Americans?” he added.


There have been rumours that the Supreme Court might dismiss the case without offering a ruling. Though both Greigson, Peterson and his protest group are anxiously awaiting a decision made by others for others, Bauer offered some perspective on the court’s possible case dismissal.


“This could be the most unbiased decision that they could make,” Bauer said. “But then millions of Californians, of Americans, won’t know which side is truly right.” 


“How can they know for sure what is right and wrong if someone doesn’t decide for them?”

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