2004-09-30

    
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  2004-09-30

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September 30, 2004
  Tommy StinsonPDF files may take a moment to load

Tommy Stinson is better known as the scrawny, spiky-haired bassist from The Replacements. His solo-debut album under the major label Sanctuary appears to be of the pop-rock strain from his garage punk roots.

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September 30, 2004
  Run Chico RunPDF files may take a moment to load

There aren't many truly unique bands out there. That alone is enough to recommend Run Chico Run. Their blend of lo-fi pop, keyboard rock and psychedelia on Shashbo, among myriad other influences, doesn't have any easy reference point. "Lifestyles of the Living Dead" mixes creepy lyrics about swaying corpses with a shuffling drums and lounge keyboards, while "Blue Bikes" floats like a combination of early Pink Floyd and a children's song.

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September 30, 2004
  Mob hopes for a hit on Elizabeth RexPDF files may take a moment to load

"To me it's an exploration of death and how people deal with it," explains Len Harvey, an actor in Elizabeth Rex. It's a bit ironic considering the play is one of the last works written by renown Canadian author and playwright Timothy Findley before succumbing to cancer in 2002. "That already brings to it a lot of weight. A lot of weight."

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September 30, 2004
  Shark Tale loses itself at sea... NemoPDF files may take a moment to load

It's a big ocean out there, and obviously Dreamworks felt there was room for two big fishes in a sea of riches when they decided to do a Finding Nemo of their own. Oscar (Will Smith) is a small and unimportant fish in a big ocean, until he inadvertently crosses paths with Don Lino (Robert DeNiro), Godfather of the Shark mob. Lino is looking for revenge when his favorite son is killed, and Oscar, seeing an opportunity to get out of the slums, takes credit for the kill and becomes a public hero.

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September 30, 2004
  Film Fest Preview: MemronPDF files may take a moment to load

While some would call the mockumentary outmoded or downright obsolete, several films over the last few festival cycles (Fubar being chief among them) have proven the old gal still got some life left. The immediacy of a single camera and smart script can affect audiences by blurring the line between reality and fiction.

September 30, 2004
  Film Fest Preview: Let's Rock Again!PDF files may take a moment to load

Everyone has a story to tell. In the case of Joe Stummer his story begins in 1976 with his prolific band The Clash. Touting themselves as "rebels with a cause" the band managed to gain enormous support from the young British populous. Strummer's hands on approach to rebellion landed him in jail for various minor indiscretions, ranging from vandalism to stealing a pillowcase, which only seemed to bolster their punk rock image.

September 30, 2004
  Film Fest Preview: EveryonePDF files may take a moment to load

When you throw together two gay guys about to take the plunge, four couples in various states of marital unrest, a few affairs, an overbearing mother and drug addict. You expect something thought-provoking and full of irony. Instead, you get Bill Marchant's film Everyone, flat and crammed with trivialities and melodrama.

September 30, 2004
  Film Fest Preview: DiG!PDF files may take a moment to load

Rockumentary is so passe. Its monstrous soul staked by VH1's stakes of blah in the face of band woes. Until the hunter became the hunted in a metaphorical jungle codenamed DiG!

Anytime you edit 1,500 hours of raw footage down to less than two hours, there are bound to be a few good shots. But the constant barrage of insanity ensuing in the film can only be attributed to one force, Anton Newcombe, the lead singer and explosive frontman of the Brian Jonestown Massacre.

September 30, 2004
  Harry KnucklesPDF files may take a moment to load

Before The Bride fought, chopped and lopped Bill and the deadly Viper Assassination Squad, Canada's own special agent battled an ancient Aztec Mummy, flesh eating zombies and the luscious Leopard Lady. His name? Harry Knuckles, a.k.a. Special Agent Spanish Fly, and he's back with an arsenal of flying feet and fist of kung fu fury.

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September 30, 2004
  No ill fate for this Canadian filmPDF files may take a moment to load

Quick, think of four things common in all Canadian films. You're thinking slow, dark, gloomy, and boring? We may have a long history of drab cinema, but a new school of Canadian filmmakers aims to change all that. Mark Lewis' new film Ill Fated, screened this year at the Calgary International Film Festival, is a madcap dash across rural BC as a prodigal father races to fix the broken pieces of his legacy by stopping his son from knocking up his daughter.

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