2005-09-15

    
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  2005-09-15

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September 15, 2005
  Spun: Robert Temple and His Soulfolk Jazz EnsemblePDF files may take a moment to load

Robert Temple is an aging hippie trying to make a go at a music career with What Would You Do?, a concept album protesting the Iraq war and the Bush administration. Unfortunately, Temple decided to include a song vilifying poor drivers who don't use their turn signals at the climax of the album, effectively ruining any political momentum the album could have possessed.

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September 15, 2005
  Spun: Haste The DayPDF files may take a moment to load

Labelling bands based upon the type of music they play has become all too easy today. Often, these simple, unwarranted labels are more cracks at a band and their style than a proper description of the music itself. In the early stages of their career, Haste the Day were tagged as a metalcore band but have lately been ostracized with their new album, When Everything Falls. In reality, the band's second album should be viewed based upon the strong pieces of musical performance it contains, regardless of what style of music it is.

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September 15, 2005
  Spun: Doug Cox & Sam HurriePDF files may take a moment to load

If it's new blues music you crave, look no further than Hungry Ghosts, the first, and hopefully not last, collaboration between Canadian acoustic blues guitarists Doug Cox and Sam Hurrie. These two pick and slide their way through an enjoyable montage of original tunes and covers by Duane Allman, Jagger/Richards and more.

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September 15, 2005
  Spun: DredgPDF files may take a moment to load

Catch Without Arms, the latest album from Dredg, is brimming with bombast and grandeur, every song a would-be epic drawing as much from U2 as At the Drive-In. Guitars chime and drums pummel, always driving towards the inevitable catharsis. Gavin Hayes uses a poster-boy smooth croon to sing about the pressures of selling out, drinking too much, and being melodramatic in a way bound to resonate with junior and senior high students continent-wide.

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September 15, 2005
  Spun: Jason CollettPDF files may take a moment to load

Arts & Crafts, the Toronto-based indie label, has seen its star rise epically in the last few years with hyped-up and hyperbole-inducing releases from the likes of Broken Social Scene, Feist and Stars. Now with Jason Collett's Idols of Exile, the label adds another feather to its already impressive cap.

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September 15, 2005
  Spun: Hilary DuffPDF files may take a moment to load

Hilary Duff, emulated by many a tween, was almost enjoyable as Lizzie McGuire. The syndicated Disney children's series was witty and entertaining, and Lizzie's stubborn quirkiness provided a positive role model for young girls. Alas, if only Hilary Duff had stuck to children's entertainment instead of making the jump to recording and producing actual records.

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September 15, 2005
  Spun: Pink MartiniPDF files may take a moment to load

Pink Martini's Harvard trained founder and pianist, Thomas M. Lauderdale, says the group's long anticipated sophomore release is "like an urban musical travelogue." However, he is not talking about travelogues in the Bill Bryson sense, but rather in the Quantum Leap sense.

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September 15, 2005
  Spun: Slow Nerve ActionPDF files may take a moment to load

A word of caution to potential listeners: you may find the cover art on Slow Nerve Action's Lovenasium a bit offensive, or at least confusing. If you disregard the picture of the nude woman adorned in a classy top hat, you'll find some comfort in the 12 tracks of Lovenasium. This release is loaded with funk bass lines and beats to keep the groove moving along all night long. The album also features plenty of guitar solos complimenting the rest of the instruments and at the same time creating a unique sound of its own.

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September 15, 2005
  Spun: VailhalenPDF files may take a moment to load

Last year's EP Becs D'Oiseaux set high expectations for Vailhalen's full length debut, and Pop Violence does not disappoint. From the thundering intro of "Awake in Flight" through the piano refrain and odd chanting of closer "Love's A Home," the album maintains a delicate balance. It is artistic without being arty, vintage without being retro and above all else, plain solid.

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September 15, 2005
  Music Interview: The kids come backPDF files may take a moment to load

You're walking down the street, groovin' to some Comeback Kid on your Ipod Nano and enjoying your already fantastic day of walking and grooving. Then suddenly you see a crisp 20 lying at the side of the road. You pick it up, and a wave of euphoria passes through your bad self. Wake The Dead begins to play in your ears. The blood starts pumping, the adrenaline starts rushing, and you have an overwhelming desire to scream and dance in the middle of the street.

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