Racist pamphlets found

Pamphlets discussing the "qualitative difference in the intelligence of Blacks and Whites" have been found on campus, on the eve of the International Day for the Elimination of Racism.

Posted onto boards with clean, white, plastic-headed tacks, the pamphlets, titled "The Roots of Civilization," publish a 1978 article out of National Vanguard, a publication of the National Alliance.

This is the same group that published the pamphlets titled "Why Conservatives Can’t Win" found on campus last November. Both were authored by Dr. William Pierce, the founder of the National Alliance.

Although both pamphlets address the same subject–the need for "White Americans" to protect their culture and civilization from the degradation of racial integration–"The Roots of Civilization" is more explicitly worded than its predecessor.

"Blacks… are not just slower to learn, on the average, than Whites, but Blacks–all Blacks–have mental processes which are qualitatively different from those of Whites," it reads. "A man or a woman who has spent the last four years learning to talk good line about a lot of things he doesn’t really understand is the last person ready to accept the fact of his own ignorance–or the fact of the race-based inferiority of the smooth-talking Black news announcer."

"It’s disappointing," said Constable Doug Jones of the Calgary Police Service. "I just spoke to [Campus Security Manager] Lanny Frit at the Hurricane Carter event [Monday night] and asked him if he had heard anything else from the group. He had said no. Now, just a few days later, this shows up."

The pamphlets were concentrated in the Science Complex, the same general area where the "Why Conservatives Can’t Win" pamphlets were distributed.

According to its website, the National Alliance is an organization operating out of the US. Their goals are the establishment of an Aryan Society, Economic Policies based on racial principles and a government "wholly committed to the service of our race and subject to no non-Aryan influence."